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Christian Peterson, Attorney At Law

PLEASE NOTE: To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us in person, via telephone or through video conferencing. Please call our office to discuss your options. Click here for more details.

Helping Families With Estate Planning In Pearland And The Surrounding Communities

Attorneys at Carrie Kemper Allen, PLLC

Choosing an executor for your estate

On Behalf of | Jun 24, 2022 | Estate Planning

Your will details what you want to be done with your assets after you pass away. Having an updated will prevents your loved ones from fighting and making difficult decisions while they are grieving.

In order to carry out your wishes, someone must take the lead. This is where your executor comes in.

Choosing the right executor

Your executor should be a responsible person with good organizational and communication skills. His or her duties will include:

  • Maintaining your property while your will is in probate
  • Paying bills and taxes
  • Distributing assets to your heirs
  • Making court appearances

In Texas, an executor is entitled to a 5% commission for handling the estate. Choose someone who will approach the task with the same seriousness as any other paying job.

Appointing an alternate executor

When the time comes, your chosen executor may be unable to fulfill his or her duties. To prepare for this possibility, you should name an alternate executor.

An alternate executor is not a co-executor. He or she only steps in if the original executor is unavailable.

Mistakes to avoid

When choosing your executor, you should avoid these common mistakes.

Neglecting to update your will

Circumstances and relationships can change. You should revisit your will periodically and update your choice of executor if the person you chose is no longer suitable.

Choosing someone too close

Avoid appointing someone with a significant personal stake in your estate, such as one of your children.

Choosing an unqualified person

Generally, felony convictions, poor credit history and non-U.S. citizenship disqualify an individual from serving as an executor.

Your executor is an important person in the estate planning process. Once you make your wishes known, the right individual can ensure that everything proceeds according to plan.